Futuristic setting

Escape from Summerland

Original Blurb: "In the near future a drone war rages in the skies, but below in Summerland there is only one thought: who's going to feed Jacquotte?"

  • Take Control of Three Characters each with their own Strengths and Weaknesses!
  • Explore an Abandoned Fairy Themed Park!
  • Four Different Endings!

Robot Finds Kitten

This is a really fun little game if you're ever bored. You can select varying levels of difficulty to play, but really it's not a very hard game at all. I consists of a robot moving around a black screen examining all of the letters (objects) until it finds the cat. It's very simple with just letters or characters representing the objects in the world, but it's fun and repeatable.


A decently-crafted short game in the crashed-spaceship genre. The planet you're stranded on isn't all that alien, though: it's got primitive humans and at least one yak. (Perhaps the "Stellar Patrol" is the same one as in Planetfall, with its mission of regaining contact with lost human colonies.) The title is misleading: although you start the game with concussion-induced amnesia, your loss of identity is not central to the plot, which has more to do with finding out why the ship crashed and then arranging for a rescue.

Orevore Courier

You are the security officer aboard on a space freighter. Your only other two crew members are the pilot and an engineer. Locked inside your office you monitor everything going on around the vessel. A sudden pressure drop sets a chain of events in motion that keep you well occupied.

Taunting Donut

This is a one-room game with two simple, but very logical, puzzles. It doesn't aim very high, but it hits its target. The sparse implementation is well-excused by the premise that the protagonist has been abducted by aliens who are not all that sure of what constitutes ideal living conditions for a human being: literally everything plays into one of the game's puzzles in some capacity, and subtle details give the protagonist himself a nice bit of characterization.


Baluthar features horror tinged with science fiction, in a rare example of where elements of the two genres fuse into a cold, grim, dreary concoction. (Yes, that is praise!) It has a rather rich back-story and gives you a flavor of dread with an opening quote from Ecclesiastes (one of the heaviest books in the Bible). With all this said, it doesn't go for the atmospheric or emotional jugular, but rather presents puzzles along the way that -- if they worked -- would support the unfolding of the story nicely. Unfortunately, all progress halts at the door scene.


The staff's jubilant anticipation of the first human transfer was now replaced with dread. Why had the Professor fallen ill so suddenly? And how callous of the Overseers to insist on proceeding without delay!


A piece of ecological science fiction with obvious similarities to the James Cameron Avatar, Changes relies on a contrast between an idyllic setting and violence and destruction. Some fairly nasty behaviour is required to make much progress in the plot.

Across The Stars: The Ralckor Incident

In the year 5367 IR, humanity is well established throughout the galaxy. It has been over twenty-thousand years since the Zal'tacs passed through our solar system, trading their technology for our food and resources.

Lucius Winterson, the Eurmerican ambassador delegated to greet the aliens, was so successful in his mission that he eventually became Earth's sole representative on the Zal'tac Council. In return, he acquired personal technology that has kept him alive throughout the millennia, creating an Empire in the process, the Xulthe'en Empire.


Another mission. Just when you had settled in for a nap.

As a member of the Drop Team Beta of the Galactic Marines, you are send on a mission to some research institute. For some reason, your team mates do not arrive there. As it turns out, you need to shut down a temporal reactor. The only catch here: there is more than one reactor to be shut down...