Stories that resolve around a world view


Voices is a strong, story-driven parser game told from the perspective of a mysterious invisible figure, whom we learn more about throughout the game. The narrator is the figure, while the PC is a young girl they speak to.

Jacks or Better to Murder, Aces to Win

An interesting effort, though it's so short that it feels more like an introduction to a game than a game in its own right. You're a high-ranking authority in a nameless religion, scheming for more power and avoiding plots to bump you off. It's not very interactive--the game without warning periodically launches into what amount to long cut-scenes, in which your character does lots of things that you can't control--but the story is nicely put together.

Cana According To Micah

Being an account of the wedding at Cana, by the servant Micah; in which further details, doubtlessly apocryphal, are given of the event, including his contention with a surly Baptist, an interfering orphan, and a proliferation of women named Mary.

It's a broad truth in IF that the best works dealing prominently with Christian themes are written by non-Christians. Cana is the exception.


Baluthar features horror tinged with science fiction, in a rare example of where elements of the two genres fuse into a cold, grim, dreary concoction. (Yes, that is praise!) It has a rather rich back-story and gives you a flavor of dread with an opening quote from Ecclesiastes (one of the heaviest books in the Bible). With all this said, it doesn't go for the atmospheric or emotional jugular, but rather presents puzzles along the way that -- if they worked -- would support the unfolding of the story nicely. Unfortunately, all progress halts at the door scene.

Sins Against Mimesis

Your lover Black left, and your days are full of loneliness. Your progress in finding him, however, is blocked by none other than the Devil himself; and to get rid of him, you must commit the seven deadly sins. And that is just the beginning...

This game basically consists of a slew of in-jokes strung together. In a riff from John's Fire Witch, you must gather seven text adventures representing the deadly sins. After that, it just gets sillier. Features a hint menu.


You are a deity -- not an omnipotent one, but one who works through communication and inspiration. The main character is the hapless Bellclap, a pathetic shepherd who worships you and has taken shelter from a rainstorm in your temple.

Beat the Devil

In Robert Camisa's Beat The Devil, Lucifer is building an addition to Hell, and you're his betatester. He overheard you mumbling about how you'd sell your soul for a chance with the object of your affections, and, being surfeited with souls already ("Washington and Hollywood provide me with all the souls I'll ever need to buy."), makes you this alternate offer: wander through this Stygian mall and defeat the incarnations of the seven deadly sins, and that date is yours. It's a fun concept, and Beat The Devil gives it an energetic, cartoonish implementation.